Processed Meats

Processed Meat Unsafe For Human Consumption; Cancer Experts Warn of Dietary Dangers – Mike Adams

https://www.naturalnews.com/022288_sodium_nitrite_processed_meat.html

World cancer experts have finally declared what NewsTarget readers learned nearly four years ago: That processed meats cause cancer, and anyone seeking to avoid cancer should avoid eating all processed meats for life.

Hundreds of cancer researchers took part in a five-year project spanning more than 7,000 clinical studies and designed to document the links between diet and cancer. Their conclusion, published in the World Cancer Research Fund’s report, Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and the Prevention of Cancer: a Global Perspective (2007), has rocked the health world with a declaration that all people should immediately stop buying and eating processed meat products and that all processed meat should be avoided for life!

Processed meats, the report explains, are simply too dangerous for human consumption. And why? Because they contain chemical additives that are known to greatly increase the risk of various cancers, including colorectal cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, leukemia, brain tumors, pancreatic cancer and many more. The report, published at this DietAndCancerReport.org website also recommends that consumers:

• Avoid all sugary soft drinks for life.
• Exercise at least 30 minutes a day.
• Get lean and fit, without becoming underweight.
• Limit consumption of ALL meats (even fresh meat).
• Breastfeed all infants for their first six months, avoiding infant formula.

It is the first time that any internationally-recognized cancer organization has found the courage to make a partial proclaimation about the health hazards of the chemicals found in processed meat products. It’s almost as big a deal as when the American Medical Association, after years of taking millions of dollars from tobacco companies, finally admitted that smoking causes lung cancer and heart disease.



What is “processed meat” exactly?
A woman asked me this question at a recent live event where I was warning the audience about the dangers of chemicals found in popular grocery products. Frankly, I was surprised to hear the question. But I’ve since learned that many people really don’t know the difference between processed meat and non-processed meat (“fresh” meat).

Here’s the difference:

Fresh meat usually has only one ingredient: The meat! Fresh meat is refrigerated and has a very short shelf life (just a few days, usually). It’s usually packaged in simple wrappers, with no fancy logos or color printing.

Processed meat has many ingredients and is usually packaged for long-term shelf life. These products almost always contain sodium nitrite, the cancer-causing chemical additive that meat companies use as a color fixer to turn their meat products a bright red “fresh-looking” color. Processed meat products include:

• Bacon
• Sausage
• Pepperoni
• Beef jerky
• Deli slices
• Hot dogs
• Sandwich meat (including those served at restaurants)
• Ham
• Meat “gift” products like Christmas sausages
• Meat used in canned soups
• Meat used in frozen pizza
• Meat used in kid’s lunch products
• Meat used in ravioli, spaghetti or Italian pasta products

… and many more meat products.

Unless it says “NITRITE FREE” on the front label, you can bet it’s made with cancer-causing sodium nitrite!

(Hint: You will only find nitrite-free meat products in two places in the grocery store: 1) In the fresh meat section where you can buy freshly-ground hamburger, for example, and 2) In the freezer, where you can find “natural” meat products that are nitrite-free.

What are the dangerous chemicals in processed meats?

Sodium nitrite is one of the most dangerous chemicals added to processed meats. Please be aware:

• You MUST read the ingredients list to find the sodium nitrite! Meat product companies do not list this ingredient on the front of the package.

• Even ORGANIC meat products and NATURAL meat products can still contain sodium nitrite. So read the labels to be sure, and avoid buying any meat product made with sodium nitrite.

• Be especially careful of food for kids! Virtually all packaged food products containing meat and marketed to children contain sodium nitrite! (Read the ingredients to protect your children.)

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a second dangerous chemical found in virtually all processed meat products. MSG is a dangerous excitotoxin linked to neurological disorders such as migraine headaches, Alzheimer’s disease, loss of appetite control, obesity and many other serious health conditions. Manufacturers use MSG to add flavor to dead-tasting processed meat products.

Essentially, dead meat products look and taste dead (because they are), so meat companies use the following three ingredients to make them look fresh and taste interesting:

Sodium nitrite makes the meat look red and fresh. (But it promotes cancer.)

MSG makes the meat taste savory. (But it causes neurological disorders.)

Processed salt makes the meat taste more interesting. (But it causes nutritional problems and high blood pressure.)

On top of these three chemical additives, processed meats also contain saturated animal fat that is often contaminated with PCBs, heavy metals, pesticide residues and other dangerous substances.

You can learn more about dangerous chemicals in the food supply in my book, Grocery Warning, available from Truth Publishing.

Or you can download my free Honest Food Guide from www.HonestFoodGuide.org which reveals the true health dangers of numerous chemicals added to processed foods. The Honest Food Guide has now been downloaded by over one million people.



Protect yourself and your family

Processed meats promote cancer. There is simply no question about the scientific validity of that statement, and anyone who disagrees with it is either working for the meat industry or hopelessly behind the times on their nutritional research.

The processed meat industry, of course, insists that processed meat is perfectly healthy and that you can eat all you want. It’s no surprise, of course: Big Tobacco insisted that cigarettes aren’t really bad for your health and that nicotine isn’t addictive, either. No industry is really willing to admit that its products are hazardous to human health, and the processed meat industry is no exception.

To protect yourself from these dangerous processed food products, here are the action steps to take:

1) Check the ingredients of all processed meat products in your refrigerator and pantry. Throw out any products containing sodium nitrite or MSG (monosodium glutamate).

2) Inform your spouse, roomates or children of what you’re doing and why you’re doing it. Show them the sodium nitrite right on the label of the products as you throw them out. Let them know that the World Cancer Research Fund now recommends that ALL consumers avoiding eating processed meats for life!

3) Boycott all processed meat products for life! Never buy processed meats again. That includes shopping at the grocery store, eating at a restaurant or consuming foods at a social event.

4) Spread the word. Tell others about the dangers of sodium nitrite. Print out the Honest Food Guide (www.HonestFoodGuide.com) and share it, if you want. Let people know that processed meats are dangerous for their health.



Why some people commit nutritional suicide

Of course, many low-income, low-education consumers still continue to smoke cigarettes AND eat processed meat products. (Attend any NASCAR event and you’ll find a whole crowd of ’em!) But the smart consumers (who represent the real future of human civilization, by the way) are wising up and increasingly opting for healthier foods made without dangerous chemicals.

There are people in society today who exhibit a strong desire to commit nutritional suicide. For those people, there is beef jerky, hot dogs, frozen pizza, cigarettes and over-hyped “energy” drinks. The future of these people is easy to see: Cancer, diabetes, heart disease, chemotherapy, pharmaceuticals, pain, death and bankruptcy.

Thankfully, there are other people who believe in taking care of their health and in living informed lives with outstanding health. For these people, there are living foods, superfoods, raw cacao, sprouts, rainforest herbs, sunshine, juicing and joyful exercise. Their future is also clear: Exceptional mental performance, freedom from chronic pain, excellent vitality and longevity, spiritual awareness, abundant living and much more.

Which group do you want to belong to?

You make that decision every time you shop for food. When you buy processed meats, you put yourself on a timeline track towards disease, suffering and medical victimization. But when you avoid meat products and focus on a plant-based diet, you are creating a future filled of abundance and health. It’s up to you to decide which of these futures you’d rather create.

Regardless of which future you choose, there’s no judgement from me. You’re free to do what you want with your life and your own body. Some people choose to abuse their bodies as chemical playgrounds, living in the moment and dying young. That’s their choice. Others choose to extend their lives and honor their bodies, living an extended, purpose-filled life. That’s fine, too. I don’t really care how people live their lives, I just want people to live consciously and understand that their decisions create results.

Anyone who decides to eat processed meat products on a repeated basis is simply creating a result. That result is cancer, and over enough years, that cancer will grow to the point where it shows up on a scan. That’s when the doctor says, “You have cancer” and starts prescribing even more toxic chemicals known as chemotherapy agents. This is not a disease with an unknown cause. In fact, cancer is incredibly easy to both prevent AND cure — but only if you understand the fundamentals of nutrition.

For now, just remember:

Processed meats = sodium nitrite = cancer

If you don’t want cancer, don’t eat processed meats. Ever.

Why You Should Think Twice About Eating Processed Meat

https://www.mashed.com/225406/why-you-should-think-twice-about-eating-processed-meat/

We’ve all likely eaten some form of processed meat in our lives. According to WebMD, if you cure meat, salt it, smoke it, or add preservatives to it — it’s likely processed. This includes many delicious meats like bacon, cold cuts, beef jerky, and hot dogs. But while these items may taste appetizing, the impact they have on our health is harder to swallow. The World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified processed meat as a carcinogen. In addition to potentially causing cancer, those that eat a lot of this type of meat have been shown to suffer from heart disease and diabetes (via WebMD).

Are deli meats or products that say they are nitrate-free safe to eat?

Nutritionist for the American Cancer Society, Colleen Doyle, told NBC News that more natural-sounding meats may sound better, but they likely aren’t. “They use natural sources of preservatives,” she explained. “Many companies are using celery powder, celery juice, or celery salt, which are high in nitrates. They can still label their product ‘nitrate-free,’ because those are natural and not synthetic, but they are nitrates nonetheless.” So if you’re eating deli turkey, chicken, or ham with natural preservatives, you’re still consuming nitrates.

Do You Really Want to Eat Hot Dogs After Knowing This? – Dr. Mercola

Do You Really Want to Eat Hot Dogs After Knowing This?

(Dr Mercola) The hot dog is one of America’s most popular foods, with the average person consuming 50 of them per year. Hot dogs are one of the most nutritionally bankrupt foods.

Yet for decades, they’ve been given a free pass, granted one pardon after another thanks to their towering status in American culture. But when you look at what they are giving you in return, you will want to seriously reconsider their status.

The hot dog’s gustatory glow took a significant hit in 2009 when the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) issued its landmark report1 about hot dogs and cancer risk, based on more than 7,000 scientific studies.

AICR determined that every 50 gram serving of processed meat you consume daily—for example, just ONE hot dog—raises your risk for colorectal cancer by 21 percent. Despite these health warnings, frankfurters have been unstoppable.

Transformation of Slaughter By-Products Into Hot Dogs

Many blame the hot dog’s carcinogenic effects on nitrates and nitrites, but I would argue that this is an overly simplistic view. When you look at what goes into hot dogs and how they are made, there is plenty of blame to go around.

Between the type and grade of “meat” used and its sources, as well as the torrent of chemicals added to make the dogs safe and palatable—of which nitrates are only one—it’s easy to understand how serious health problems could arise.

Most of the meat and meat by-products come from confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) where animals are tortured in crowded, unhealthy, unsanitary, and cruel conditions, as the primary goal is cheap food, not quality food.

Here is the not-glorified version. They start with an animal carcass that’s been stripped of all desirable cuts, boil the heck out of it, force it through a metal sieve, add water, grind it up into a slimy carcass paste (“meat emulsion” or “meat batter”), add a bunch of chemicals to make it taste good and binders to make it stick together, then extrude it into links.3, 4
‘And ALL the Trimmings’

Once desirable meat cuts are removed from beef, pork, and poultry (steaks, chops, ribs, thighs, breasts, briskets, etc.), what remains is a carcass consisting mostly of gristle, fat, and offal. The meat industry refers to this as “trimmings.” According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO):5

“The raw meat materials used for precooked-cooked products are lower-grade muscle trimmings, fatty tissues, head meat, animal feet, animal skin, blood, liver and other edible slaughter by-products.”

The butchering process imparts a considerable amount of bacteria to these carcasses, but because hot dogs are pre-cooked, manufacturers can get away with using these pieces and parts even if they are teeming with bacteria.

Cooking helps kill them, as well as separating the remaining muscle, fat, and connective tissues from the head and feet bones. The slimy paste that results from this rendering brew is what’s referred to as “mechanically-recovered” meat. The process of manufacturing hot dogs is colorfully summarized in theDaily Mail:6

“In vast metal vats, tons of pork trimmings are mixed with the pink slurry formed when chicken carcasses are squeezed through metal grates and blasted with water. The mush is mixed with powdered preservatives, flavorings, red coloring and drenched in water before being squeezed into plastic tubes to be cooked and packaged.”
Where’s the Beef?

Now that you know the basics of the process, let’s take a closer look at the ingredients. Meat makes up a relatively small proportion of the average commercial hot dog. And it’s typically low-quality meat and meat by-products—which technically are not meat at all.7

The Truth About Nitrates and Nitrites

Many are confused about nitrates and nitrites, so let me clear up the confusion. Nitrates are present in many vegetables, such as beets, celery, lettuce, spinach, and most other leafy green vegetables. When you eat nitrates, your body converts a small percentage of them into nitrites. Nitrites and nitrates are not inherently bad for you—in fact, they are the precursor to nitric oxide (NO), which lowers your blood pressure and exerts mild anti-inflammatory effects.

Sodium nitrite is a synthetic preservative added to meats like hot dogs to help them maintain that nice pink color. The problem is, in the presence of heat—especially high heat—nitrites can combine with amines in processed meat to form nitrosamines, and it’s these that are carcinogenic. Nitrosamines inflict cellular damage and have been linked to cancer, typically in your colon, bladder, stomach, or pancreas. Processed meats are far more prone to nitrosamine formation than vegetables, due to being higher in amines and intensively heat processed.11, 12, 13, 14

Vitamin C inhibits some of the nitrosamine formation, which is why 550 ppm ascorbic acid is now required added to all processed meats in the US.15 Vegetables contain more vitamin C, beta-carotene, and other antioxidants, which is another reason why the nitrates in vegetables don’t cause a problem.

According to the University of Minnesota Extension, around 90 percent of the nitrite in your body comes from vegetables, while just 10 percent comes from processed meats.16 When meat or fish is cooked at high temperatures, other potent carcinogens are also created, such as heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). If your processed meat is smoked, you can add polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the list.
What About Nitrates in Organic Hot Dogs?

Natural or organic hot dogs may not be much lower in nitrite—and some may even be higher than conventional hot dogs. Companies that label their products natural or organic must use natural sources of the preservatives, which usually come in the form of celery powder or celery juice, as celery is naturally high in nitrate.

A 2011 study published in The Journal of Food Protection found that natural hot dogs had anywhere from one-half to 10 times the amount of nitrite of conventional hot dogs.17 A similar scenario exists for bacon. So, buying organic hot dogs is not necessarily going to reduce your nitrate exposure—although it will likely result in a higher quality food product in many other respects.
Brainwashing Kids Into Loving Junk Food

Unacceptable rates of childhood obesity and disease are evidence of the damage being done to our children by hot dogs, sodas, and other unhealthy foods. With such grave health dangers, the earlier that fast food habits can be nipped in the bud, the better. Kids are extremely vulnerable to and under constant bombardment by junk food marketing.

If you want to see evidence of how powerful this brainwashing can be, take a look at the eye-opening video of Jamie Oliver’s experiment, where he attempts to educate a group of elementary schoolers about what really goes into chicken nuggets. Of course, he COULD have used hot dogs for the example and the outcome would have probably been the same. Despite his success in disgusting them with what really goes into a chicken nugget, they STILL want the nuggets! This experiment reveals the depth of children’s emotional attachment to fast food—which also shows just how effective fast food marketing is to children.

An even more powerful marketing strategy has emerged for brainwashing your child, which takes advantage of smartphones and other mobile devices. The “advergame” is a game that promotes a particular brand, product or message by integrating it into play. The game IS the advertisement, engaging children to such as extent that they form strong relationships with the product or brand, so they consume more of it—and research proves it works. For example, KFC’s “Snack in the Face,” which mimics the massively popular game Angry Birds, is described as “the future of junk food advertising.”18
The Best of the Wurst

If you are going to eat hot dogs or other processed meats once in awhile, there are a few considerations that may help you reduce your risk of adverse health affects. Again, these options are not ideal as these meats are still processed, but the following guidelines will ensure you are consuming a product that is better for you than the vast majority of processed meats on the market:

    Look for “uncured” varieties that contain NO nitrates
    Choose varieties that say 100 percent beef, 100 percent chicken, etc. This is the only way to know that the meat is from a single species and does not include byproducts
    Avoid any meat that contains MSG, high-fructose corn syrup, preservatives, artificial flavor, or artificial color
    Ideally, purchase sausages and other processed meats from a small, local farmer that makes those products right on the farm, whom you can ask about the ingredients

Truly Healthy Meats are a Much Better Option

In contrast to eating products that are little more than a heat-processed slurry of reassembled slaughterhouse remains, real meat is a different story altogether. Make sure the meat you consume is grass-fed, organically and humanely raised, preferably from a local farmer you know and trust. Grass-fed beef tends to be leaner and have higher levels of vitamins, minerals, and cancer-fighting CLA. It also has a healthier ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fats. Organic farms tend to provide far more sanitary conditions, so the animals are less likely to harbor dangerous pathogens.

Organic, grass-fed standards do not permit non-medical use of antibiotics, and with antibiotic-resistant infections being a major public health hazard today, this is an important consideration. To counteract some of the harmful effects of cooking, add homemade spice rubs, herb-enhanced marinades, or even fresh blueberries to your meat prior to cooking. This will not only augment its nutritional value, but also reduce the harmful substances like heterocyclic amines that are formed during the cooking process. Consume plenty of fresh vegetables along with it, which will further enhance its nutritional value.

Frying red meat boosts risk of prostate cancer by a whopping 40 percent

https://www.naturalnews.com/036942_red_meat_fried_foods_prostate_cancer.html

(NaturalNews) Prior research studies have implicated overcooking meats, especially red meat, due to the formation of carbon-based amines that greatly increase the risk of digestive cancers over many years of consumption. These studies have suggested eating meats that have been stewed or roasted in favor of char grilled or well done to avoid the charred ‘bark’ that forms as a result of barbequing or grilling over open flames.

A research team publishing in the journal Carcinogenesis from the University of Southern California and Cancer Prevention Institute of California found that cooking red meats at high temperatures, especially pan-fried red meats, may increase the risk of advanced prostate cancer by as much as 40 percent. This new study provides startling new evidence on how red meat is cooked not only increases digestive cancer incidence, but may also increase the risk for prostate cancer.

Consuming grilled, well done and barbecued meat produces cancer causing heterocyclic amines
Researchers gathered data from nearly 2,000 individuals participating in the California Collaborative Prostate Cancer Study. Each participant completed a comprehensive questionnaire that evaluated the amount and type of meat intake, including poultry and processed red meat. Additional information gathered included the cooking method: pan-frying, oven-broiling or grilling. Over the course of the study, more than 1,000 of the men included in the study were diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer.

The lead study author, Dr. Mariana Stern noted “We found that men who ate more than 1.5 servings of pan-fried red meat per week increased their risk of advanced prostate cancer by 30 percent… in addition, men who ate more than 2.5 servings of red meat cooked at high temperatures were 40 percent more likely to have advanced prostate cancer.” The scientists found that among red meats, the consumption of hamburger meat, but not steak, was linked to an increased risk of prostate cancer. They speculate that the findings are a result of different levels of carcinogen accumulation found in hamburgers, as they attain higher internal and external temperatures faster than steak.

Cooking method is a significant factor in determining the risk of developing many different forms of cancer, due to the formation of the DNA-damaging carcinogens called heterocyclic amines (HCAs). During the cooking of red meat and poultry, HCAs are formed when sugars and amino acids are cooked at higher temperatures for longer periods of time. It is important to note that this does not vilify the consumption of free-range, grass-fed red meat in moderate portions. Avoid well done, barbequed or grilled cuts of any meat (red meat, chicken, pork or fish) to significantly lower risk of prostate and digestive cancers.